DRESSEL COAT OF ARMS & SEALS

 

Table of Contents
  1. Summary
  2. Seals
  3. Sketches of Dressel Seals
  4. Early Examples of the Dressel Seal
  5. Sculptured Stone Examples
  6. Published, 18th to 20th Century Examples and Variations
  7. Miscellaneous Twentieth Century Examples
  8. John Dressed Berg’s  (XXVI.17b Nr 1) right arm’s tattoo.

     

SUMMARY:

In the heraldry of many European countries the motif of golden crescent moons and stars has been used since the very beginning of the Middle Ages, (in Polish heraldry the coats of arms: Bojomir, Cielatkowa, Drzewica, Leliwa, Sas). Known are also the charges representing two crescent moons turned away from each other (in Polish heraldry the coats of arms: Ostoja and Przegonia). The coat of arms of the Dressel family represents a motif well known from the earliest beginning of European heraldry.

"The oldest example of the coat of arms of the Dressel family comes from the seal of Johann von Bennhausen, Sept. 15, 1314. The oldest example of the Dressel arms used by a Dressel is the seal of Geunther von der Dressul on a document dated February 6, 1361. On the shield of this seal are two crescent moons (the points are turned away from each other), accompanied by four stars. These charges appear in all documents of the coat of arms of the Dressel family. Also found are variants in the color of the field of the shield and variants in the later drawings of the crest. These variants are shown in Jozef Pilnacek's, "Famillien chronik des Geschlechtes von der Dressel." The main variant consists in the various colors of the field, which in most cases is black, but in some documents is blue. Adam Boniecki in "Herbarz Polski," vol 5, for the Polish branch of the Dressel family gives the red color for their field, which is an evident mistake. At the Main Archive of Old Acts in Warsaw, there is preserved the original diploma conferring the rights of a foreign nobleman, Jerzy of Roszewo Dressel, Chorazy Bulawy Wielkiej (Standard Bearer of the Great Baton) of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania, enacted by King Stanislaus August on November 18, 1778. It presents the coat of arms on a black field.

The charges of the coat of arms of the Dressel family (i.e. two crescent moons and four stars) are in all examples gold. From the two basic color variants of the shield of the Dressel coat of arms (i.e. black and blue) the first one is natural for the charge which represents two golden crescent moons and four golden stars in the black night sky. This is so because the Dressel coat of arms draws the motif of its emblem from the observation of the astral phenomena, therefore, the heraldric preference is black.

Since the color of the field should be black with golden charges on it, then the mantling of the coat of arms should be black and gold.

The crest of the Dressel coat of arms in later documents also has variants, one has two arms in armor, the other has two arms in black clothing, but both pairs of arms are holding a black furled flag with two gold crescent moons and four gold stars, repeating the charges in the field. The flag is turned to the left. The variant of the crest with arms in black clothing is found in the work of Valentin Koenig, "Adelshistorie," 1727-1736, as well as in the quoted diploma conferring the rights of nobility on the foreign nobleman Jerzy of Roszewo Dressel from 1778. But the more correct chivalric variant is the crest with arms in armor because it represents the held flag as the early Dressel knights would hold it in battle.

The blazon of the Dressel coat of arms should represent on a field of black two crescent gold moons turned away from each other, accompanied by four six- pointed gold stars. The crest should represent two arms in armor holding a black furled flag turned to the left, with the charges being the same as on the shield. The mantling is black with gold lining. The gold of the crescent moons and the gold stars of the charges as well as the lining of the mantling can be replaced with the yellow color..."

Dr. Ottfried Neubecker, former president of the Wappen-Herold Deutsche Heraldische Gesellschaft, agrees with Dr. Kuczynski description of the Dressel Coat of Arms.

Two legends of the origin of the Dressel coat of arms are: in early German tribal history the Dressel ancestors were priests because the crescent moon and stars were symbols of the priestly cast, and when the tribes were converted to Christianity, the priestly families took the crescent moon and stars for their coat of arms; that the Dressel ancestors were members of the first Crusade against the Moslems, and when they returned to Europe, they took the crescent moon and the star as their arms, which is the symbol of the Moslems, to recall their service in the Crusades. There is no documentary evidence for either of these legends at this time.

back to table of contents

 


 

SEALS

 


 

THE EARLIEST KNOWN EXAMPLE OF THE BENNHAUSEN DRESSEL COAT OF ARMS & SEAL:

 

    

 

for sources, see exhibit 37

back to table of contents

 


 

THE EARLIEST KNOWN EXAMPLE OF THE DRESSEL COAT OF ARMS AND SEAL:

 

1361: Feb, 6



 

For sources see exhibit 37a

Translation of the above document:

Molberg (today called Mhlberg), "Guntheri de Drosul", sl to the proclamation from Duke Rudolf of Saxony, his brother, and his nephew that there should be a conference at Mhlberg to settle the differences between the Archbishop of Magdeburg and the former Bishop of Merseburg. The above German document with its 14 seals which includes the oldest known Dressel seal still exists intact and is to be found in the Dresden National Archiv, Nr. O.U. 3623

A translation of the seal's border (above); will be included when it is found)

back to table of contents

 


 

THE ONLY KNOWN PRESSED SEAL EXAMPLE OF THE DRESSEL COAT OF ARMS:

 

Late 19th or early 20th century pressed Dressel Seal from the Eckhart v. Stutterheim collection:

 

 

detailed view of the pressed seal

back to table of contents

 


 

SKETCHES OF DRESSEL SEALS

 


 

The 1553 and 1592 sketches of Dressel seals are taken from documents found in the Saxon Meiningen National Archive in Meiningen, Germany.

 

SEAL OF DIETRICH v. der DRUSSEL

1553:
SEAL OF ADAM v. der DRUSEL

1592:

detailed view of the 1553 seal


detailed view of the 1592 seal

 

back to table of contents

 


 

THE EARLIEST KNOWN CARVED WOOD EXAMPLE OF THE DRESSEL COAT OF ARMS:

 

..is dated from the beginning of the 18th century and is still to be seen on the pulpit of the Lutheran parish Church in Drahnsdorff, Saxony.

 


detailed view of the Dressel Pulpit

 

back to table of contents

 


 

THE EARLIEST KNOWN PUBLISHED, PRINTED EXAMPLE OF THE DRESSEL ARMS

 

..is found in Koenig, Valentin, "Genealogische Adelshistorie des Sachsischen Adels," Leipzig, 1727.


detailed view of the earliest known published, printed example

 

back to table of contents

 


 

SCULPTURED STONE EXAMPLES OF THE DRESSEL ARMS:

...the tombstone of Geog Heinrich born 1648, died 1706. To be found on the wall Roman Catholic church St. Jana Nepomuccna in Pielgrzymka, Silesia.  



detailed view of the stone sculpture

back to table of contents


Baptismal font


detailed view of the baptismal font

back to table of contents

 


 

PUBLISHED 20th CENTURY EXAMPLES

FROM POLISH PUBLICATIONS, OSTROWSKI, WARSAW

Juliusz Hr. Ostrowski, Ksiega Herbowa Rodow Polskich, Book IV, published in Warsaw Poland, 1808




detailed view of the 1808 coat of arms

back to table of contents

 


 

Published 1935, Warsaw Book I (below)

1935:



back to table of contents

 


 



The Dressel coat of arms as described and presented in George Dressel's Indigenat signed by king Stanislaus Augustus signed on November 18, 1778

1778:


detailed view of the Indigenat example, 1778

back to table of contents

 


 

Dressel Coat of Arms taken from Johann Siebmacher's "Wappenbuch" published between 1605 and 1961 (below)

1605 - 1961:

detailed view of Siebmacher's "Wappenbuch" coats of arms

back to table of content

 


circa 1880



The Dressel coat of arms taken from josef pilnacek Familienchronik des Geschlechtes von der Dressel, privately published in Vienna in March 25, 1952. (below)

detailed view of the variations in Pilnacek's book

back to table of contents

 


 

The Dressel coat of arms taken from josef pilnacek Familienchronik des Geschlechtes von der Dressel, privately published in Vienna in march 25, 1952. Pilnacek believed that the Dressel colors were Gold and Blue. However, subsequent research showed that the original Dressel colors were gold and black.

1952:


detailed view of the gold and blue variation from Pilnacek's book

back to table of contents

 


 

Tapestry in wool by Bogdan Dryszel (Generation XXVI, ID 20), a Master Weaver, Mragowa, Poland

1970:

Dressel Coat of Arms published by Herbarz Szlachty Polskiej in Bonn Germany 1982 (below)

1982:

Dressel coat of arms taken from unspecified documents at the Belarus National Archive, Minsk Belarus (below.)

1999:



 

 

Designed by Schmidt v. Schmidtfelden in Vienna, Austria 1949

1949: